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How to Offline Scan using Windows Defender

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windows_defender_logoWindows Anniversary Update for Windows 10 v1607 and later allows offline scanning, without the need for being connected to the Internet. The Offline Scan actually scans while Windows isn’t running. So it’s more like an antivirus boot disc. This is very useful as most malware runs inside Windows, while rootkits that hide from Windows during the boot up process, should be detected when running a scan outside Windows.

IMPORTANT: Before you use Windows Defender Offline, make sure to save any open files and close apps and programs.

How to Offline Scan using Windows Defender

  • Make sure you have Windows Defender enabled
  • Next – open the Start menu > Settings > Update & security then select Windows Defender, to open Settings
  • You should see Windows Defender Offline. Click > Scan Offline button
  • You will be signed out and your PC will shutdown and be restarted
  • On restart, you may see a command prompt window briefly and then you will see “Windows Defender Offline” message
  • After a short while the above message disappears and you will then see the Windows Defender offline scanning progress
  • The scan will take about 15 minutes before Windows is booted to your desktop

How to fix Windows 10 Anniversary Update problems

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WindowsOver the past week or so, users were installing the Windows 10 Anniversary Update without issues. However, when they restarted their computer, Windows 10 would not boot up. At this current time, there is no official response from Microsoft on the freezing issue after updating.

Rolling back to a previous version of Windows has worked in some instances, but not all. If you did a clean install of Windows 10, rather than upgrade from either Windows 7 or Windows 8, your problems will most likely still persist. You might want to look at disabling Secure Boot, reinstalling device drivers and or editing the Registry (but only if you are technically minded).

Reddit posters (see link below) have helped provide clarity on the issues they are experiencing. It does appear there is no definite solution for the freezing issue. I suggest you visit the Reddit link below to check out the latest information, currently standing at 32 updates. You should read all the updates and poster comments before starting to diagnose the issue.

https://goo.gl/6qypTb – this link will open a new tab to Reddit.com

As with most operating system updates, you should always save regular backups, so in the event of issues, you can rollback to a previous version.

How to disable Android app Device admin rights

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Updated: If you use an Android device and regularly download and install apps from the Google Play Store, you may have noticed that some apps require device admin rights to be disabled before you can “Force stop” or “uninstall” an app. Device admin allows developers to create security-aware apps that are mainly useful for enterprise settings. These settings (or policies as they are referred too) may stop a user from installing or uninstalling an app for example.

I’ve started noticing quite a few Android mobile security apps are employing device admin rights to their consumer apps. The main reason for doing this is that the AV vendors want to lock down their app in the event some malware looks to disable or remove their security app, but it is also to with defining a generic security standard for mobile security app development.

Glancing through developer forums it’s clear to see (and I’m one of these) that not being able to kill an app because it is using up large amounts of CPU or RAM time, isn’t that useful to us end -users. Apps and operating systems do have memory leakage and probably always will from time to time. So, how do you disable device admin rights for a particular app so that you can enable ‘Force stop’; ‘Uninstall’; ‘Clear data’; ‘Clear cache’; and ‘Clear defaults’ from within App Manager? It’s actually very simple folks:

How to setup Google prompt 2-Step Verification (2SV)

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Google securityGoogle recently introduced a new setting for 2-Step Verification (2SV). They are hoping the new setting called ‘Google prompt’ will make it easier for more people to use multi-factor authentication security. Currently, 2SV allows you tap a Security Key (such as the U2F YubiKey) as well as entering a verification code sent to your mobile phone. You can also use the Google Authenticator app.

Google prompt allows you to approve by tapping a ‘Yes’ prompt that will pop up on your mobile phone. You can access 2-Step Verification from your computer, Android device or iPhone, but only if you have a Google account. In addition Android devices will require the latest Google Play Services (2SV is part of Play Services) and iPhone 5S or later the Google Search app.

It’s important to note that the Google prompt setting is designed as an alternative second step to either using a Security Key or receiving a voice or text message.

The process below is the same whether you use an Android device, iPhone 5S (or later) or computer.

How to enable Google prompt

How to setup and use Android Pay in the UK

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androidpayAndroid Pay is a mobile wallet that can store your credit cards, debit cards and loyalty cards. It allows you to make contactless payment without using a card. Hold your Android device near (1-2 centimetres) a contactless payment point and your device will show the card used and vibrate as well as confirm payment.

You will also receive a payment notification if you have notifications enabled. Notifications are linked to each card you use, so you will be able to review the merchant details and the payment details. Any Android device running KitKat 4.4 or above and has an NFC module inside will be able to use Android Pay.

Remember: The merchant will never see your 16-digit card number as Android Pay uses a virtual account number. You can also tap on each transaction linked to your card to confirm the name of the merchant and payment amount as well as the virtual number that was used is correct.

IMPORTANT NOTE: You will need to setup a PIN code, password or pattern in order to authenticate a transaction up to £100 in the UK. For transactions up to £30 you only have to wake your device to make a purchase,