Latest Entries

How to locate and protect your lost or stolen iPhone


findmyiphoneIf you lose your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch and you don’t have another iOS device, you will find the following information very useful. If you intend on removing your device from your Apple account, Activation Lock will be turned off, which will allow someone else to activate and use your device.

If you decide to erase your device, you should contact your wireless carrier so they can disable your account and prevent calls, texts and data use.

The following will only work if you enabled Find My iPhone (including iPad or iPod touch).

  • Sign in to on a Mac or PC with your Apple ID and Password (Don’t check ‘Keep me signed in’}
  • You will also get an email from Apple to tell you about your iCloud sign in
  • Click > All Devices – you will see a list of iOS devices that are either offline or connected to the Internet
  • Select a device to view its location on a map. You can play a sound, activate Lost Mode or Erase iPhone
  • Turn on Lost Mode – this will allow you to remotely lock your device with a passcode, display a custom message with your phone number on your missing device’s Lock screen, and monitor your device’s location*

Use SuperSU to control your Android root settings


supersuUpdated: Controlling your root settings is very important, especially as it opens your Android device up to the threat of malware. if you are familiar with rooting you will know that you can tweak and modify the way your Android software and hardware behaves. Granting apps root allows you to have vastly more control of your device and apps than without.

You should though be very aware that allowing your Android device to have root access does come with an element of security and privacy risk. Given the risk, SuperSU is often used by modders to control Android root settings on a per app basis.

What is SuperSU? SuperSU allows for advanced management of Superuser access rights for all the apps on your device that need root. It’s that simple!

I’m going to assume you already have a rooted device and that you have an intermediary knowledge of device rooting using SuperSU developed by ChainfireXDA. SuperSU allows for advanced management of Superuser access rights for all the apps on your device that need root.

IMPORTANT: This is the updated SuperSU privacy policy from CCMT, which is effective August 29, 2016.

Here is a quick guide using SuperSU v2.78 SR1, on how to control your Android smartphone root settings:

How to Offline Scan using Windows Defender


windows_defender_logoWindows Anniversary Update for Windows 10 v1607 and later allows offline scanning, without the need for being connected to the Internet. The Offline Scan actually scans while Windows isn’t running. So it’s more like an antivirus boot disc. This is very useful as most malware runs inside Windows, while rootkits that hide from Windows during the boot up process, should be detected when running a scan outside Windows.

IMPORTANT: Before you use Windows Defender Offline, make sure to save any open files and close apps and programs.

How to Offline Scan using Windows Defender

  • Make sure you have Windows Defender enabled
  • Next – open the Start menu > Settings > Update & security then select Windows Defender, to open Settings
  • You should see Windows Defender Offline. Click > Scan Offline button
  • You will be signed out and your PC will shutdown and be restarted
  • On restart, you may see a command prompt window briefly and then you will see “Windows Defender Offline” message
  • After a short while the above message disappears and you will then see the Windows Defender offline scanning progress
  • The scan will take about 15 minutes before Windows is booted to your desktop

How to fix Windows 10 Anniversary Update problems


WindowsOver the past week or so, users were installing the Windows 10 Anniversary Update without issues. However, when they restarted their computer, Windows 10 would not boot up. At this current time, there is no official response from Microsoft on the freezing issue after updating.

Rolling back to a previous version of Windows has worked in some instances, but not all. If you did a clean install of Windows 10, rather than upgrade from either Windows 7 or Windows 8, your problems will most likely still persist. You might want to look at disabling Secure Boot, reinstalling device drivers and or editing the Registry (but only if you are technically minded).

Reddit posters (see link below) have helped provide clarity on the issues they are experiencing. It does appear there is no definite solution for the freezing issue. I suggest you visit the Reddit link below to check out the latest information, currently standing at 32 updates. You should read all the updates and poster comments before starting to diagnose the issue. – this link will open a new tab to

As with most operating system updates, you should always save regular backups, so in the event of issues, you can rollback to a previous version.

How to disable Android app Device admin rights


Updated: If you use an Android device and regularly download and install apps from the Google Play Store, you may have noticed that some apps require device admin rights to be disabled before you can “Force stop” or “uninstall” an app. Device admin allows developers to create security-aware apps that are mainly useful for enterprise settings. These settings (or policies as they are referred too) may stop a user from installing or uninstalling an app for example.

I’ve started noticing quite a few Android mobile security apps are employing device admin rights to their consumer apps. The main reason for doing this is that the AV vendors want to lock down their app in the event some malware looks to disable or remove their security app, but it is also to with defining a generic security standard for mobile security app development.

Glancing through developer forums it’s clear to see (and I’m one of these) that not being able to kill an app because it is using up large amounts of CPU or RAM time, isn’t that useful to us end -users. Apps and operating systems do have memory leakage and probably always will from time to time. So, how do you disable device admin rights for a particular app so that you can enable ‘Force stop’; ‘Uninstall’; ‘Clear data’; ‘Clear cache’; and ‘Clear defaults’ from within App Manager? It’s actually very simple folks: